U.S. Flag Facts They Never Taught You in School

Posted by Derrek Coss on Jul 20, 2017 8:09:00 AM

Did you know that the current 50 star U.S. Flagdesign of the United States flag has lasted longer than any other design in U.S. history? Essentially this is because we have not added a new state to our great country since the addition of Hawaii on August 21, 1959. Luckily, Robert Heft the designer of the 50 star U.S. flag has already designed a 51 star flag so if we ever choose to add another state we’ll be good to go! Learn more flag facts below!

 CTA- Flag Life

(Short on Time? Click Here to Download our FREE Guide to Maintaining Your U.S. Flag!) 

 

Alt colors for original U.S. flag design

In colonial America there were only 8 different dye colors that were easily produced. Light blue, indigo blue, gold, red, white, yellow, green and black. A few of these colors we’re ruled out right away as yellow was the color of quarantine and black has long been symbolic of death in western culture. That leaves just green, gold, and light blue as the colors not selected by Francis Hopkinson for use in his flag design.

 

flag facts

Get this! Using the flag as decorative bunting has played a major roll in U.S. history at least once. President Lincoln visited Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865.  He was provided a box seat decorated with bunched flags, a common practice at the time. Later that night John Wilkes Booth crept up behind Lincoln and shot him. Booth then jumped onto the railing of Lincoln’s box seat and proclaimed “Sic semper tyrannis” (“Thus always to tyrants”). He then planned to jump down to the stage to make his escape. However, as Booth went to make his move his spur caught on the decorative flag bunched along the railing causing him to loose his balance, land awkwardly and injure his leg. Booth pushed thru the pain and escaped only to be captured nearby, a few days later.


For years after this an urban legend was spread that the flag that reached up and grabbed Booth was “Old Glory” herself. However, it turns out that the actual “hero flag” was the flag of the Treasury department Regimental Unit.

*Referenced The Care and Display of the American Flag by the editors of Sharpman.com 2004 for entire blog post.

Flag Care

 

Topics: american history, American flag, flag facts, U.S. flag, flag history

The history of Memorial Day and decorating with flags

Posted by Derrek Coss on May 23, 2014 10:48:00 AM

Memorial Day, which is observed on the last Monday of May, commemorates the men and women who died while in the military service.  In observance of the holiday, many people visit cemeteries and memorials, and volunteers often place American flags on each grave site at national cemeteries.  A national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time.

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Memorial Day History:

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

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Local Observances Claim To Be First:

Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

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Official Birthplace Declared

In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

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All above text taken from The U.S. Dept. of Veteran Affairs website www.VA.org.

Topics: american history, accent banner, American flag, appliqued flags, U.S. flag, flag history, USA flag

Accent Banner in the Winners Circle at the 144th Belmont Stakes. . . well, sort of anyway.

Posted by Derrek Coss on Jun 5, 2012 5:05:00 PM

Okay, so you won’t see any of us standing in the Winner’s Circle but you will see one of our most unique products to date!

We were asked to create the blanket that will be draped over the winning horse in the upcoming Belmont Stakes. The blanket is a hybrid of techniques and materials. The field is an elegant forest green velvet material and the seal containing the race logo is crafted in layers of nylon fabric.  Each layer was painstakingly stitched on (appliqued), color by color, and hand- trimmed to reveal the Belmont Stakes logo in detail. The double-layered construction of the finished product has made it thick and soft—all in all, a handsome adornment for the proud winner.

Belmont Blanket Pics

Here at Accent Banner we’re rooting for “I’ll Have Another” to win at Belmont, making him the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. Hard to believe it’s been 34 years since “Affirmed” outran the competition and accomplished that amazing feat.  Whatever the outcome, it’s bound to be exciting!

I'll Have Another Horse
 Photo from: Reuters/Wall St. journal

For more information on this year’s Belmont Stakes visit www.belmontstakes.com. To catch all of the racing action tune into NBC Saturday the 9th starting at 5pm. If you’re lucky enough to be going to the race, do us a favor and pop some pics of the winner draped in our blanket. We’d love to see them and there just might be a little something in it for you as well!

Accent Banner is privileged to have been chosen to fabricate the 2012 Belmont Stakes Winner’s Circle

blanket.  We enjoyed the challenge and eagerly await the moment of its intended purpose!

Topics: appliqued banners, applique, sewn banners, sports banners, american history, accent banner, banner design, event banners

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