Flag Parts 101: What are Snap Hooks?

Posted by Accent Banner on Sep 27, 2017 9:19:23 AM

When it comes to flying your flags properly and securely, you will want to make sure you have the best parts. The following article is about a small but highly important piece of equipment for any flag; the snap hook. 

 

What are Snap Hooks?

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Snap hooks attach your flag to the halyard, or rope. You can find them in nylon, brass or stainless steel. Nylon hooks are most commonly used in residential areas as they produce less noise when they hit against your flag pole. Brass and stainless-steel are more often found in commercial areas because they will last longer and withstand the wear and tear from the weather. Stainless-steel snaph ooks are by far the most durable of the three. If you buy a brass or stainless-steel snap hook, you should add snap hook covers to protect them and cut the amount of noise they create. Checkout our step by step article on how to attach a snap hook cover for more information. 

 

 

How to Attach a Snap Hook?

1.) Pinch your halyard between your thumb and forefinger to create a loop.   
 
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2.) Next poke this loop you've just made through the eyelet of the snap hook.

NOTE: do not tie your snap hook to the halyard. Doing so eliminates the ability to adjust your snap hook position according to your flag size. Make sure you adjust the snap hooks as you clip your flag in the last step, because if you have the snaps too far apart or too close together, it will cause your flag to fly improperly.

 

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3.) Pull your loop up and over the snap hook then fold it back towards the halyard. You want to pull a large enough amount of slack through so that you can wrap the halyard loop over the snap hook. An easy way to adjust the snap hooks on the halyard is through the loosening and tightening of the slack.

 

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4.) Finally, make sure you tighten the rope so that the snap hook is secure. After the halyard loop is over the snap hook you need to take up the slack so the snap hook is stable. If done correctly, the more the wind blows, the tighter and more anchored the snap hook becomes. After finishing this step, repeat the process for the second snap hook and attach your flag.

 

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We hope this article has helped explain an often overlooked yet incredibly important piece of hardware for flying flags properly. If you are inneed of snap hooks or want to request a quote on custom flags, flagpole installation, or anything else flag and banner related please contact us today!

 

FREE D.I.Y. Guide to Your First Pole Banner Project!

 

Topics: flag care, flag parts, snap hooks

USA Flag Anatomy and Vexillology Terms

Posted by Derrek Coss on Jan 22, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Do you know the definition of “vexillology?”   If you over heard a discussion between two vexillologists (and we’re sure there are at least two of them) it would likely sound like a conversation in some strange alien language.  Well, hold on to your potatoes folks because we’re about to give you a lesson in vexillology, the scientific study of flags.

 gonfalonsFlag Anatomy and Vexillology Terms

The study of flags is quite interesting. No, seriously it is.  Just, do a  Google search on the term “gonfalon” and you’ll see tons of examples of what we mean. To learn more about gonfalons check out our gonfalon page. 

 

Gonfalon - an elaborate flag, usually of intricate design hung from a crossbar. Gonfalons can be used for a variety of reasons. Often graduation gonfalons are used at high school or college graduations. 

 

 

 

 

Here are some additional flag terms you may find interesting:

 flag terms or parts of a flag

Canton – the upper hoist quarter of a flag (see hoist below)

Charge – an emblem or device added to a flag or shield

Cockade – an ornament (rosette) or other significant colors worn as badge

Field – the background color of a flag or shield

Fimbriation – a thin band of color that separates two other colors

Fly – the half of a flag away from the flagstaff

Hoist – the half of a flag nearest the staff

Jack – a flag flown at the bow of a ship to indicate its nationality

Jolly Roger – common name for flag supposedly used by pirate…Arr

Livery Colors – the main colors of the field and main figure on a coat of arms

Obverse – the side of a flag seen when the staff is on the spectator’s left

Saltire – a diagonal cross

Staff – the pole from which a flag is flown

Fascinating isn’t it? Don’t forget to search “gonfalon” and may, your un-tattered flag always fly true in a stiff breeze.

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Please note the source for the above information is from Flags by Kent Alexander & Dr. Whitney Smith (Consulting Editor), published in 1992 by Mallard Press, NY, NY.

Topics: American flag, flag facts, flag terms, flag repair, U.S. flag, flag history, USA flag, flag parts, flag anatomy, gonfalon, vexillology

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