8 tips for flying your flag on Independence Day!

Posted by Accent Banner on Jul 4, 2018 8:45:00 AM

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1. Never let the flag touch the ground. When hanging or displaying your flag, the key is to not damage it – so don’t drop it or let it touch anything beneath it.
2. Never wear the flag as a costume. The U.S. Flag Code makes very clear that no part of the flag should be worn as sportswear or as a costume, or used to make drapery or bedding. For those who really want to show off their patriotism, opt for a patch or a lapel flag pin worn near your heart.
3. Never display the flag except from sunrise to sunset, unless it is lighted at night. This means, according to the American Legion, that other people should always be able to recognize the flag. If there’s bad weather, you must take the flag down unless you have an all-weather flag.
4. Never place the flag anywhere but at the peak of the staff, except when the flag is at half-staff. When the flag is suspended over a sidewalk from a rope extending from a house to a pole at the edge of the sidewalk, the flag should be hoisted out, union first, from the building. (The union is the blue field of stars.) When hanging the flag vertically, the union must always be at the top.
5. Never wad the flag, but rather fold it properly. The way you store your flag is important. The American Legion says to fold it into a triangle, similar to a three-corner hat, with the blue and stars showing.
6. Never raise the flag slowly: It should be raised briskly, but lowered slowly and ceremoniously. 
7. Never carry the flag flat or horizontally. It should always be carried aloft and free.
8. Never display the flag with the union down. Only in instances of extreme danger to life or property should the flag be displayed that way, as a distress signal.
For more information on how to display and dispose of your flag, go to http://www.usflag.org/flagetiquette.html.

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Topics: applique, American flag, U.S. flag, flags, national flags, U.S. Flags, outdoor flags, vexillology, applique flags, Flag Display, flag, retiring a flag, US Flag Facts

U.S. Flag Facts They Never Taught You in School

Posted by Derrek Coss on Jul 20, 2017 8:09:00 AM

Did you know that the current 50 star U.S. Flagdesign of the United States flag has lasted longer than any other design in U.S. history? Essentially this is because we have not added a new state to our great country since the addition of Hawaii on August 21, 1959. Luckily, Robert Heft the designer of the 50 star U.S. flag has already designed a 51 star flag so if we ever choose to add another state we’ll be good to go! Learn more flag facts below!

 CTA- Flag Life

(Short on Time? Click Here to Download our FREE Guide to Maintaining Your U.S. Flag!) 

 

Alt colors for original U.S. flag design

In colonial America there were only 8 different dye colors that were easily produced. Light blue, indigo blue, gold, red, white, yellow, green and black. A few of these colors we’re ruled out right away as yellow was the color of quarantine and black has long been symbolic of death in western culture. That leaves just green, gold, and light blue as the colors not selected by Francis Hopkinson for use in his flag design.

 

flag facts

Get this! Using the flag as decorative bunting has played a major roll in U.S. history at least once. President Lincoln visited Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865.  He was provided a box seat decorated with bunched flags, a common practice at the time. Later that night John Wilkes Booth crept up behind Lincoln and shot him. Booth then jumped onto the railing of Lincoln’s box seat and proclaimed “Sic semper tyrannis” (“Thus always to tyrants”). He then planned to jump down to the stage to make his escape. However, as Booth went to make his move his spur caught on the decorative flag bunched along the railing causing him to loose his balance, land awkwardly and injure his leg. Booth pushed thru the pain and escaped only to be captured nearby, a few days later.


For years after this an urban legend was spread that the flag that reached up and grabbed Booth was “Old Glory” herself. However, it turns out that the actual “hero flag” was the flag of the Treasury department Regimental Unit.

*Referenced The Care and Display of the American Flag by the editors of Sharpman.com 2004 for entire blog post.

Flag Care

 

Topics: american history, American flag, flag facts, U.S. flag, flag history

How to Display a US Flag at Night

Posted by Alan J. Duro on Sep 22, 2016 7:30:00 AM

Showing your pride of the stars and stripes is an ideal way to ensure your patriotism shines bright at work or home. However, no matter how visible your US flag may be in the daylight hours, it can be trying to keep your flag visible once the sun goes down. It is a matter of etiquette to either take your flag down at night or keep it illuminated. There are a few helpful tips to keep in mind when you display a US Flag at night.

 

Lighting a Basic Flag Pole

If you have an average flag pole, you really don't have to make an expensive investment to keep it illuminated after dark. Go with an inexpensive light bulb base that you can simply plug right into an extension cord. Many of the home center stores carry lights designed to work outdoors and included a spike for easily installation in your lawn or mulch bed. When you set up the light, simply aim the bulb upward so that it is shining in the direction of the flag. This technique is cheap and it works just fine for a flag pole that stands ten to fifteen feet.

 

Illuminating a High-Standing Flag at Night     Display a US Flag at Night

Having a tall-standing flag pole on your property allows for viewers to witness your admiration of Old Glory from afar, but keeping the flag illuminated at night will require a little more effort. It is a good idea to invest in a simple electric spotlight that has a reflective backing to direct the aim of the light directly upward to the flag. You can also use a basic light fixture fitted with a high-wattage halogen bulb, such as a 150-watt type, and plug the fixture into a timer so it kicks off and on as needed.

A relatively newer option, and one that available through Accent Banner is a solar light. These fixtures mount directly to the flag pole and do not require any wiring. Some even included a small back up battery just in case you have a few cloudy days in a row.

 

Keeping Your House-Mounted Flag Visible After Dark

A flag mounted at an angle from your home is fairly simple to keep visible at night if it is near your porch or patio where you will probably already have a light fixture anyway. If your house-mounted flag is not within the vicinity of your outdoor lighting, you can always have an electrician add an extra fixture that is wired right into your existing switch. 

For more flag information and resources checkout our other blog posts on Flag care at www.accentbanner.com.

 

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Topics: U.S. flag, Flag Display, Displaying a Flag

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